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was going to afghanistan and the iraq and wanted to learn from these two men what was the relevance and is a possible i missing something? and kept asking questions about vietnam over and over again there were both amazed that he sat there and listen to in the first time going into his first national security council meeting, the first point* he makes to his people is "afghanistan on is not vietnam" why does he have to say that at the beginning embassy thinks there is a possibility of getting into another vietnam? and bruce who does books for the brookings press at that time was thinking through the firstenergy paper on of guinness and into bruce told less the ghost of vietnam walk the corridors of the white house every day. >> period explain to me how would is those close can affect different presidents in such extraordinarily different fashion. for example,, a jimmy carter trying to go into iran to rescue the hostages and up with a disaster on his hands. thing you have george h. to be bush who you just said send 500,000 troops into iraq and kuwait. theoretically the same lessons t
in afghanistan >> ah, yes. and that is a very important part of "the haunting legacy" because chapter 3 with carter and really right up through with reagan and bush one, vietnam and afghanistan have been sort of intellectually married and why do i say that? because zbigniew brzezinski whom you know very well and has undoubtedly many on this program many times, brzezinski when he wasnational security advisor to prident carter, we were very fortunate. we got ahold of hisecret wall streeting memos to carter about what he thought carter ought to do in foreign policy. zbigniew brzezinski actually had in his mind that if we could suck the russians in more deeply into afghanistan we could create what he called heir vietnam." and in his mind, that kind of a loss, soviet troops in humiliation, having to leave afghanistan to go back to the soviet union loaded up with drugs, terrible shape, the equipment absolutely destroyed, they went back and in spig's mind, this could lead to the disintegration of the communist power in the soviet union because the red ar is the core the strength, the inner str
money may be missing in afghanistan and you won't believe where it might be going. we have details a disturbing new report that's coming up. >>> plus exhausted and starving. we're tracking desperate efforts under way to flee the worse drought to hit somalia in half a century. my goal was to take an idea and make it happen. i'm janet long and i formed my toffee company through legalzoom. i never really thought i would make money doing what i love. [ shapiro ] we created legalzoom to help people start their business and launch their dreams. go to legalzoom.com today and make your business dream a reality. at legalzoom.com we put the law on your side. say i'm missing england. i type in e-n-g... and he gives me a variety of options. would you like to have a look at a map, my lad? ah, why not? shall we check on the status of your knighthood? yes. again? yes, again, please! thank you. with my digital manservant, i'll never be homesick again. would you like me to put the kettle on, sir? no, i'd like you to get rid of that ostrich. it's been here a month. [ male announcer ] think, type, go
and military strategy in afghanistan and pakistan. if confirmed, general dempsey, who currently serves as army chief of staff, will succeed admiral mike mahlon who will retire a the end of september. a democrat carl levin chairs the senate armed services committee. >> good morning everybody. the committee meets this morning to consider the nomination ofmo general martin dempsey to bethii chairman of the joint chiefs of staff. it was not long ago that general dempsey came before us for his nomination hearing to become ago chief of staff of the army. we welcome him back. thanks again for his 36 years o dedicated service to the nation and his willingness to serve asm the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff. as we know from those decades of service, general dempsey is an exceptionally well qualified american soldier and leader.al we we were reminded of the last hearing, hell is also a proud we we husband, father and grandfathero huand,l dempsey, will you remain grateful for the sacrifices that you and your family have made over the years, for the devotion of your beloved wife and the military se
in the last four years, during the daunting challenges of the worse in iraq and afghanistan have been truly remarkable and the nation owes him our deepest gratitude. it is appropriate at today's hearing also to note the passing last week of former chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, retired arm general john shalikashivili. his personal story is well known, rising from post-world war ii immigrant youth to chairman of the joint chiefs. his example of patriotism, leadership and selfless service to the nation and our armed forces inspired the generation that leads our military today. for those of us who knew him, we treasured his professionalism, his candor, and his deep love for america and our men and women in uniform. general denver mpsey's confirma will help the transition to president obama's new security team which have seen significant changes in the last few months. the next chairman will face demanding challenges, operations in afghanistan and iraq continue to at the same time the fiscal realities that confront the nation will put tremendous pressures on the defense department's bud
war, which is iraq, afghanistan, to some extent pakistan, possibly iran. this is the battle the united states is facing. the balance of power in the region, the iran iraqi, the indo-pakistani. each one of them have destabilized over 10 years. in the air of israel relationship, barring some dramatic change in egypt over time, israel is so dominant that it creates new realities on the ground. there's a difference to what the united states really says very often. in afghanistan the united states is asking pakistan to do things that create stability, that will weaken pakistan, that potentially cratered an independent regional power in india, that the united states may not appreciate in the long run. and, of course, the invasion of iraq has destroyed the iraq power, they're forgetting nuclear weapons. iran is the dominant conventional military force in the region. if the united states is there. the united states as its policies to withdraw from iraq, the potential for iran to fill the vacuum is extremely high. that in turn changes the balance of power, orderlies the political dynamic in the
sergeant first class leroy arthur petry for his actions in afghanistan. he is the second living recipient of this award since the vietnam war. seven others have been awarded the medal of honor posthumously for their heroic actions in iraq and afghanistan. he is an elite army ranger. he lost his right arm below the elbow in may of 2008 when a grenade exploded when he threw it away saving the lives of two fellow soldiers. sergeant petry is 31 years old from santa fe, new mexico, and he and his wife ashley have four children. he will be the 85th recipient of the medal of honor. nbc news military analysis and retired general henry jacobs, and always a pleasure to have you with us on these ceremonies and the last time we watched this ceremony was salvatore giun giunta, and you know the emotions that come with it. you know what this sergeant did to save lives. it was a summer and surrounded and he put his life on the line and that is what the soldiers do everyday. >> his unit was doing the most dangerous of dangers which is to conduct a daylight raid. he was shot initially in both leg
with the terror attack rocks afghanistan, should the u.s. rethink the drawdown plan? we get on the ground assessment from those on the ground in foreign policy, senator joe lieberman and lindsey graham. what do the fundraising numbers tell us about the presidential field. we ask the sunday panel, which candid gaits are making a move -- candidates are making a move and which are stalled. on this fourth of july weekend, actor gary sinise tells us how he wants to help the veterans and the wounded warriors. all right now on "fox news sunday." hello again, from fox news in washington. as the nation celebrates the fourth of july holiday weekend. it's getting to be crunch time in the capital in the high-stakes battle over increasing the debt ceiling. here to discuss where the negotiations stand is a member of the senate republican leadership, john cornyn. welcome back to sunday sunday. >> good morning. >> on friday, the treasury department reiterated what it told us. august 2 is the date we exhaust the borrowing authority under the current debt ceiling re cap what the president had to say this w
. >>> in afghanistan, the powerful half brother of afghan president hamid karzai was assassinated today at his home in the southern city of kandahar. officials say he was killed by a trusted guard. the suspect was then killed by other guards. the taliban says the shooter was working for them. ahmed wali karzai was accused by the u.s. and local afghans of being involved in the drug trade and other illegal activities. president karzai spoke to reporters about two hours after the shooting, saying only that quote, this is the life of the afghan people, this sorrow is in every afghan home. >>> high above earth, a final walk in space. these are live pictures that we are bringing to all of you. two crew members of the international space station, you see it here, venturing out on the last space walk of nasa's space shuttle era. absolutely breathtaking. the two floated over the yucatan peninsula. take a look at these live pictures. their job today is to recover a broken pump and stow it in the cargo bay of shuttle "atlantis" which docked with the space station on sunday. the space walk was scheduled to las
, the wars in iraq and afghanistan helped change medical care here at home for good. our dr. sanjay gupta is taking a look in our special edition of "sanjay gupta m.d." coming up. >>> last month president obama announced plans to start bringing down the number of u.s. troops in afghanistan. but still u.s. troops are going to be there for years to come. come fall it will be a full decade we've been at war. so this week and next we're taking a closer look at an aspect that's easy to miss, at least until your life is on the line. i'm talking about the impact this war has had on medical care, no the just for wounded troops, but also here at home. one pretty stark example is the care that saved the life of congresswoman gabrielle giffords. a bullet through the head. the kind of wound you might see in combat. dr. peter reed was running the emergency room that day. but he learned his trade in iraq with the navy. he says with the wound like giffords' had, a decade ago, a lot of doctors would have given up before they even started. >> for most handgun injuries through and through to the head, the
a quarter of its stationed troops in afghanistan by the end of next year. sarkozy announced the pullout as a news conference with afghan president karzai in kabul on tuesday. >> translator: afghanistan is no longer in danger of being taken over by the afghanisn. the time is now to start the drawdown of troops. >> sarkozy says the drawdown about end by 2012. sarko sarkozy's move comes as other countries are withdrawing troops from afghanistan. the united states plans to bring home about a third of its armed forces by september next year, starting this month. sarkozy is facing increasing calls at home to withdraw troops from afghanistan. next year's presidential election seems to be a key factor to reduce the french military presence. >>> france is calling for the u.n. security council to dump the resolution condemning syrian president bashar al assad for attacking the french embassy in damascus. the attack left three french workers injured. supporters of assad stormed the french and u.s. embassies on monday. rioters damaged the french ambassador's car and broke embassy windows. the frenc
in afghanistan. but still u.s. troops are going to be there for years to come. come fall it will be a full decade we've been at war. so this week and next we're taking a closer look at an aspect that's easy to miss, at least until your life is on the line. i'm talking about the impact this war has had on medical care, no the just for wounded troops, but also here at home. one pretty stark example is the care that saved the life of congresswoman gabrielle giffords. a bullet through the head. the kind of wound you might see in combat. dr. peter reed was running the emergency room that day. but he learned his trade in iraq with the navy. he says with the wound like giffords' had, a decade ago, a lot of doctors would have given up before they even started. >> for most handgun injuries through and through to the head, the chance of them going to the operating room are exceedingly low. but now a days, now that we've gotten our experience about penetrating trauma from the recent iraq experience, we're aggressive about getting to the operating room. >> in iraq and afghanistan, we've learned to do as much
of money. >>> in the line of fire. cnn is embedded with u.s. troops in afghanistan when the taliban attack. we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in the situation room. a special gathering to tackle america's serious economic problems. key figures from government, business and academia came together this week in chicago for the clinton global might be difference america conference. the event was the brainchild of former president bill clinton. i sat down with him in chicago for a candid interview on the country's debt crisis, the 2012 presidential race, and much more. >> mr. president, thanks very much for joining us. good to be here. first time you've done this as far as the u.s. economy is concerned. normally it's global issues. and i want to get to that, but let's talk about some of the big issues right now. jobs, jobs, jobs. it's a crisis, a game of chicken going on in washington right now between the president, the did democrats on one side, republican leadership on the other side. how big of a deal is this august 2nd deadli
at military bases worldwide from iraq to a afghanistan and guantanamo bay. he travels with his group, which you have heard about. the cookies on the table are a tribute to that. they're the focus of a feature- length documentary, "lieutenant dan band: for the common good." it has a website. people can watch that. part of the proceeds will benefit the gary sinise foundation. while dismissing the speculation that he is running for political office, but we might follow up on that today, our guest has been an outspoken critic of bureaucracy and red tape that delays service members and veterans from getting care. he has said the nation is not doing enough to help disabled veterans and troops wounded in iraq and afghanistan. he has called on the government and private sector to spend more to the veterans provide victims of post-traumatic stress disorder, give them some help. he is a star who moonlights as a soldier's advocate. our speaker has questioned his own industry at times for producing films that portray our troops in a sometimes negative light. in partial response, our speakers served as
old and treating american soldiers in afghanistan. mandy clark will have his story. >> this is the captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with russ mitchell. >> mitchell: and good evening. nearly two months after her trial began the case of casey anthony is et is to be in the hands of the jury tomorrow. closing arguments took place today and anthony, a 25-year-old single mother accused of killing her two-year-old daughter three years ago could face the death penalty if convicted. cbs news "48 hours" mystery correspondent troy roberts has been covering the case and has the latest. >> reporter: for three years casey anthony has fought the notion that she killed her own child caylee. >> mama, papa. >> reporter: in 2008 caylee was a spirited two-year-old girl. then a missing person. and a murder victim. casey was her 22-year-old single mom who raised caylee with her grandparents cindy and george, all living together under one roof. but in june 2008 casey abruptly left home with caylee. the family did not see caylee for a month. >> i found out my gran
. >>> this was the last day in afghanistan for america's best-known general, david petraeus, who transferred command of u.s. and nato led troops to his replacement, general john allen. a west point graduate with a princeton phd, easily the most celebrated modern day general officer is leaving to run the cia as the u.s. prepares for a gradual drawdown from afghanistan. >>> when we come back here tonight, new research on head injuries and dementia and alzheimer's and a group that the researchers are most concerned about tonight. >>>, and later, they may have come up short in the end, but the u.s. women's world cup team members are still american idols. >>> we're back, as promised, with news that may help solve a mystery. researchers set out to see what happened later in life to those americans who served in vietnam. what they found, presented today at the annual meeting of the alzheimer's association, is that head injuries during that war may be linked to dementia years later. and the findings could mean a frightening scenario, of course, for veterans of our current dual wars. thousands of them have come h
a role in that contact. >> okay. i want to move on to afghanistan. you had a very interesting piece in "the new york times" in which you said that the administration should take its cues in terms of its withdraw in afghanistan from nixon and kissinger's withdrawal from vietnam. that is not usually looked upon as a model of success. so explain what you meant. >> nixon and kissinger tried to extricate the united states from the war in vietnam. they knew they weren't going to win. they were going to lose. they tried to tiptoe away and leave the local parties to keep fighting by themselves. it almost worked. but after the u.s. got out, the whole house of cards came falling down because congress wouldn't let the government support saigon because the local parties weren't able to defend themselves and so forth. i think essentially, if the obama administration can tiptoe out of the ground combat in afghanistan while continuing to support the regime in kabul and continuing to bash the enemies and so forth, essentially you could get extrication even as essentially the war continues. that str
rodriguez says he doesn't expect violence in afghanistan to start decreasing until next year. from the pentagon earlier today, this is 45 minutes. >> general rodriguez, it's counselor dave lapin at the pentagon. if you're ready to go, i'll introduce you and we'll get started. >> ok, dave, go ahead, thanks. >> thank you. good morning to those here, good evening in afghanistan. i'd like to welcome pack to the pentagon briefing room, army lieutenant general david rodriguez. he's commander of the international security assistance force joint command, also known as i.j.c. and also the deputy commander of the united states forces afghanistan. general rodriguez's current tour began in june, 2009, he became the first commander of the i.j.c. in october of that year. prior to that, general rodriguez was commander of regional command east for 15 months from january, 2007 to april, 2008. next week after two straight years in command and more than 40 months in after gap stan over the past 4 1/2 year, general rodriguez is ski wruled to change command and return stateside to have u.s. army forces
out in afghanistan or ahmed wali karzai. the president wept openly during the burial at one point climbing inside the grave to help move his brother's body. ahmed karzai was murdered yesterday by a trusted body guard. >>> there will be a second memorial service in michigan tonight for former first lady betty ford. she died friday at age 93 was mourned at funeral services yesterday in palm desert, among those attending, rosalyn carter, hillary clinton. >>> prince fielder got mvp for this three-run homer in the fourth inning. >>> 14 minutes past the hour. here's chris. >> thanks so much. >>> a blistering heat wave continues across large sections of the country, from texas to the east coast while parts of the northeast will finally see some relief today. cbs's betty nguyen is in times square with more for us today. hi betty. >> reporter: hi there chris. we've been lucky in new york, seen temperatures in the high 90s but in the plains states, this heat wave is fueling one of the worst droughts that many have seen in decades. crippling heat gripped half of the nation tuesday as the nat
deliberately put us in debt with tax breaks, the wars in iraq and afghanistan. they have borrowed all of the money. grover norquist toll call them -- told all of them to not raise taxes under any reason, host: independent from utah. caller: thank you, c-span. our founding fathers would turn over in their graves if they found out how much money we are putting our children in the dead. but they never wanted the constitution to deal with that. guest: our current levels of debt are sustainable. they are high levels of debt, but as a percentage of gdp, it is a lot lower than greece. it is a lot lower than italy. within the last couple of days, we realize they have serious problems. i do not know if the free market and a particular vision of how high are debt would be relative to gdp. they are huge, relative to the wealth we have it. economies expand over time. we have recessions, we have lifts, and we have declines. over the long term, economies grow. our economy will be much larger 30 years from now than it is today. that does not mean we want fiscal problems or we will be able to balance
karzai's brother rocking the world of afghanistan. joining us now from kabul, nbc's atia aboui. how did this happen in the fist place? we're getting new details, i know, about how exactly he was assassinated. >> good morning, willie. also referred to as awk was the younger half brother of president hamid karzai. he was shot and killed in his home yesterday in kandahar. a trusted security guard and confidant went into the home using that trust, lured awk out of a meeting, sent him into another room where they were alone the sign papers. as awk was signing those papers, that's when mohammed shot him. it's unclear if he shot hit twice in the head or three times in various parts of his body. right now what's confusing everyone is where did mohammed shoot karzai? what we understand is they're from the same klan, that they're, in fact, distant relatives. the taliban claimed responsibility saying they've worked with sadar mohammed for some time now. but many believe it could be because of a tribal feud which confuses everyone when it comes to afghanistan, because we have to remember there's mo
for the freedoms we all enjoy. they include, of course, those who have died in iraq and afghanistan. in tonight's "making a difference" report, we meet an exceptional group of women who have lost their husbands or fiances in those wars, and have joined forces now to help themselves heal and to embrace life. nbc's peter alexander has their story. >> ready, set, go! >> reporter: they are fun-loving and fearless. a brave group of women with something else in common, too. they are all military widows. who lost their loved ones in iraq and afghanistan. taryn davis was 21 when her husband, michael, was killed by a roadside bomb in iraq in 2007. >> one of the last things i said to him was i love you more than life itself. >> reporter: living without michael is an everyday struggle. >> when i went out into the world i just felt like they didn't want to embrace who i was. which was a military widow. and in the back of my mind, i'm thinking, that title, it symbolizes my husband's sacrifice and my own. and if i can get through it, maybe one day it can signify my survival. >> reporter: to help her own heal
. security has intensified after the bomb attack. now to afghanistan where five people were killed today in a blast inside of a mosque. the attack was carried out by a man who hid explosives in his turban. this took place during a memorial service for president karzai's brother, ahmad wali karzai. four more of his brothers and the governor of kandahar were in the mosque at the time but they were not heard. >> and other deadly attack in the heart of kandahar. officials were attending a service for the president's brother when the bomber struck. the police security area. among the dead, an influential clear -- among the dead, an influential cleric opposed to the taliban. the brunt of this attack was borne by ordinary afghans. late on wednesday, six villagers died in a raid during an operation to flush out insurgents from near the pakistan border. among the victims, women and children. this has led to a wave of anger among afghans. the protests have taken place pressing for the withdrawal of western forces. that is about to happen. some are wondering, at what cost. starting next week and ov
's no military solutions to the conflicts we are fighting today as a in iraq and afghanistan, but in the end of the revolution of this will be a political matter and you say that's wrong. the first order of business and winning a war mecca's to kill the enemy fighters. a very forthright statement but one that does go against the grain, and i would ask you to forget afghanistan today and assess whether you think that approach of the enemy fighters is going to lead to something that can be called a military solution. >> guest: yes i do but i'm not saying the military solution is the only sort of resolution that matters. there has to be that a military solution. there has to be the position of the mind in the enemy you're going to get killed if you go up against the americans. there was something of this in iraq in the awakening to the rest of the country the idea this is a tribal battle but they turn out to be. i think it is now being impress upon the various elements of the taliban and others. but of course in the conflict of building, helping, developing projects going on designed to do one
's effort to cut $1 billion in annual costs to the company. >>> this was the last day in afghanistan for america's best-known general, david petraeus, who transferred command of u.s. and nato-led troops in that country today to his replacement, general john allen. a west point graduate with a princeton phd, easily the most celebrated modern day general officer is leaving to run the cia as the u.s. prepares for a gradual drawdown from afghanistan. >>> when we come back here tonight, new research is on head injuries, dementia and alzheimer's, and the group that researchers are most concerned about tonight. >>> they may have come up short in the end, but u.s. team is still american idols. end, but u.s. team is still "american idol"s. your sho. one day i'm on p of the world... the next i'm saying... i have this thing called psoriatic arthritis. i had some intense pain. it progressively got worse. my rheumatologist told me about enbrel. i'm surprised how quickly my symptoms have been managed. [ male announcer ] because enbrel suppresses your immune system, it may lower your ability to fig
about afghanistan and what it calls men and women to serve and what they do so. let's look at this story. the deficit battle is favoring the gop. we will see house some of this plays out this week. : is thetion today is constitution still relevant? now to the democratic line with lawrence from new jersey. welcome. caller: thanks for taking my call. >> is the constitution still relevant? i don't think it does. most americans don't know anything about the treaty of kent. it says to return things to the way they were before. we established the federal government, the irs, and federal income-tax. anniversary ofe 2 the signing of this treaty. rights will be taken away. host: here's a comment from twitter. here's another comment on twitter. let's take a look at some final numbers. this is from culpeper, virginia. thanks for all your calls this morning. we will be back in a few moments talking about topics ranging from white people serve in the military to what americans think about patriotism. we will be right back. >> ♪ >> today on c-span, the dalai lama and vincent harding talk about non-v
at the long-term health care needs of veterans returning from iraq and afghanistan. actuaries talk about the challenge in estimating the future cost of treating brain injuries and posttraumatic stress disorder. also, the wife of a wounded marine corporal talks about her difficulty in getting care for her husband. this is an hour and 40 minutes. >> good morning and welcome to today's hearing, where we are going to examine the lifetime cost of supporting our newest generation of veterans. as we all know, when our nation goes to work, it is not just the cost of fighting that war that must be accounted for. we must include the cost of caring for veterans and families long after the fighting is over and that is particularly true today, at a time when we have more than half a million iraq and afghanistan veterans amid the hope care system that is in over 100% increase since 2008. this presents a big challenge and one that we have no choice but to step up to meet if we are going to avoid many of the famous geeks we saw with the vietnam generation. but it is more than just the sheer number of ne
that great contributions of this for the wars in afghanistan and iraq only 24% said increased domestic spending. and while there is a lot of focus on domestic spending, if you talk to the ode person, it's -- that spending is seen as -- if it involves waste, fraud and abuse. but when benefits or when the entitlements are considered, that's not considered waste, fraud and abuse. >> so when you -- when you asked him about the trade-off they're prepared to accept in terms of, you know, how much cutting are you as a citizen prepared to see, to deal with the debt what do you find? >> surprisingly, when you ask about what is more important, preserving benefits for social security and medicare, or reducing deficit or the debt, 2 to 1 people say preserve our benefits. there is very little give there. now republicans are of the -- more of the view that reducing the deficit should be given high priority. but even among republicans it's really interesting. there is a big income divide. affluent republicans say it is more important to reduce the deficit but poorer republicans, middle class and lowe
of american troops in afghanistan this weekend. >> reporter: before leaving to iraq america's defense secretary headed to afghanistan to see for himself the situation there and speak to the troops. this is the area where most of the fighting has been taking place in recent years and where the majority of u.s. forces are. this is his first overseas trip since being appointed to his new role and afghanistan is a key responsibility for panetta. the defense secretary has been very upbeat about the prospects of defeating al-qaeda during this trip. he said if they can keep the military pressure up on them and also capture or kill less than 20 of the terror group's key leaders still operating in countries between here and afghanistan and north africa, then they will have an effect strategically -- in effect strategically defeated them. his assessment comes as afghanistan prepares for the gradual drawdown of u.s. troops due to begin this summer. 10,000 are due to leave this year and another 23,000 in 2012. the defense secretary also said he hoped to drive the taliban to peace talks during the
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 160 (some duplicates have been removed)

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